Labor

  • May 24, 2024

    EEOC Asks DC Circ. To Revive Bias Case Against Union

    A Washington, D.C., federal judge erred by saying a government employee's discrimination suit against her union was essentially an unfair representation suit that belonged before the Federal Labor Relations Authority, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission told the D.C. Circuit on Friday, saying the case belongs in court.

  • May 24, 2024

    Cleaning Co. Should Pay Up In SEIU Arb. Case, Judge Says

    A cleaning company and its related entities should be required to compensate terminated workers with more than $22,000 stemming from an arbitration award, a New York federal magistrate judge recommended Friday, saying a Service Employees International Union affiliate showed the businesses were alter egos.

  • May 24, 2024

    NY Forecast: School Pushes To Arbitrate Retaliation Case

    On Thursday, a federal judge will consider a Buffalo, New York, Catholic school's bid to compel arbitration of claims brought by a former president who says she was retaliated against after she uncovered financial and academic issues at the school.

  • May 24, 2024

    NLRB Wants 2nd SpaceX Suit Paused Amid Venue Fight

    The National Labor Relations Board asked a Texas federal judge to pause SpaceX's second challenge to the agency's constitutionality while another federal court deals with a persistent venue dispute in an earlier, nearly identical suit.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden Urges 1st Circ. To Find Debt Cap Challenge Moot

    The Biden administration asked the First Circuit to affirm a finding that a government workers' union lacks standing to challenge the debt ceiling's constitutionality and that its case was further rendered moot by passage of a deal to suspend the spending limit until January.

  • May 24, 2024

    USPS Withheld Docs From Union In Mich., NLRB Judge Says

    The United States Postal Service waited too long to yield requested records to a union at two facilities in Michigan and improperly withheld records from the union at a third facility there, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding USPS violated federal labor law.

  • May 24, 2024

    Roofing Co. Must Arbitrate USW Contracting Row, Judge Says

    A roofing manufacturer must arbitrate a United Steelworkers local's grievances over subcontracting notice requirements under the labor contract terms, a Texas federal magistrate judge ruled, tossing the company's argument that the parties' pact lacks the payment remedy that the union requested.

  • May 24, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Del Monte Workers Seek $2M Deal Approval

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for the potential final approval of a $2 million deal in a wage and hour class action by Del Monte Foods Inc. plant workers. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 23, 2024

    NLRB's BLM Ruling Violates Free Speech, Home Depot Says

    Home Depot called on the Eighth Circuit to throw out a National Labor Relations Board decision finding the company illegally told a worker not to display a Black Lives Matter slogan on their apron, arguing that the board's stance violates the company's First Amendment rights.

  • May 23, 2024

    Airline Fuel Co. Asks Judge To Block Strike At JFK Airport

    A company that fuels airplanes at John F. Kennedy International Airport sued its workers' union in New York federal court Thursday, seeking a temporary restraining order blocking the union from carrying out its stated intention to go on strike Friday.

  • May 23, 2024

    Diminished NLRB 'Drowning' In Cases, Litigation, Chair Says

    The National Labor Relations Board is "drowning" as a rise in cases and increased "litigiousness" of parties tax the agency's decimated workforce, Chairman Lauren McFerran said Thursday at New York University School of Law's annual labor conference.

  • May 23, 2024

    Mercedes Loss Shows Challenge Of UAW's Southern Auto Bid

    The United Auto Workers' loss in a union representation election at two Alabama Mercedes-Benz plants could slow the pace of the union's campaign to organize non-union automakers in the South and illustrates the challenges inherent to such a project, experts said.

  • May 23, 2024

    Union Fund Trustees Fight DOL Mismanagement Suit

    Two trustees of an embattled union life insurance fund have asked an Illinois federal judge to toss the U.S. Department of Labor's claims that they let a fellow trustee siphon about $2.6 million and amended the fund's rules to shield themselves from liability.

  • May 23, 2024

    Amazon Illegally Surveilled Workers With Algorithm, Org. Says

    A workers advocacy group in Missouri accused Amazon of violating federal labor law by using "intrusive algorithms" to watch employees' organizing activities, according to an unfair labor practice charge obtained by Law360 on Thursday, advancing a legal theory from the National Labor Relations Board's top prosecutor.

  • May 23, 2024

    Biden Renominates NLRB Chair, Taps Republican For Vacancy

    President Joe Biden on Thursday announced he intends to renominate Lauren McFerran to continue serving as chair of the National Labor Relations Board, while also tapping a Seyfarth Shaw LLP partner to fill a long-vacant Republican seat on the board.

  • May 23, 2024

    Alaska Airlines, Union Beat Fired Workers' Religious Bias Suit

    A Washington federal judge tossed a suit from two Christian flight attendants who said they were illegally fired by Alaska Airlines and abandoned by their labor union for opposing the airline's support for LGBTQ+ rights, ruling there's no proof unlawful bias cost them their jobs.

  • May 23, 2024

    NLRB Official OKs Union Vote At Colo. Movie Theater

    Workers at a dine-in movie theater near Denver can have an election to decide whether they want the Communications Workers of America to represent them, a National Labor Relations Board regional director determined, nixing the company's bid to expand the bargaining unit to other facilities.

  • May 22, 2024

    Justices' CFPB Alliance May Save SEC Courts, Not Chevron

    A four-justice concurrence to the U.S. Supreme Court's decision upholding the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's unique funding scheme last week carries implications for other cases pending before the court that challenge the so-called administrative state, or the permanent cadre of regulatory agencies and career government enforcers who hold sway over vast swaths of American economic life.

  • May 22, 2024

    Carpenter Sues Union Healthcare Plan After Losing Coverage

    A union healthcare plan violated the Employee Retirement Income Security Act when it stopped working with a Bay Area insulation company whose union contract expired, a new proposed class action filed in California federal court alleges.

  • May 22, 2024

    House Labor Dems Weary Of Majority's Anti-Union Probes

    Democrats on a U.S. House of Representatives labor subcommittee called their Republican counterparts out for maintaining a busy calendar of anti-union hearings Wednesday during the committee's fifth such inquest in this session of Congress.

  • May 22, 2024

    Steel Co. Tells Mich. Court Not To Order Worker's Rehire

    A Michigan federal judge can't enforce an arbitration award requiring the rehire of a fired worker, a steel manufacturer argued Wednesday, claiming the arbitration panel went beyond the parties' collective bargaining agreement in ordering reinstatement.

  • May 22, 2024

    NLRB Official OKs Union Vote At Philadelphia Coffee Shops

    Workers at three Philadelphia coffee shops can vote on representation by a Service Employees International Union affiliate, a National Labor Relations Board official has ruled, shooting down the employer's argument that workers at two of the stores have different working conditions from those at the third location.

  • May 22, 2024

    NLRB Sets Up Eligibility Test For Northeastern Police Union

    Northeastern University in Boston violated federal labor law by refusing to bargain with a union representing campus police sergeants and detectives, the National Labor Relations Board concluded, potentially teeing up a challenge from the university to test the union's certification.

  • May 21, 2024

    2nd Circ. Partially Backs Win For Nurses' Union Pension Plan

    In a 90-page opinion, the Second Circuit on Tuesday mostly upheld a Manhattan federal judge's decision affirming an arbiter's award favoring a nurses' pension plan, agreeing that White Oak Global Advisors LLC must return "Day 1" fees totaling nearly $2 million and pay prejudgment interest said to top $22 million.

  • May 21, 2024

    Mich. Starbucks Firings Get Mixed Outcome From NLRB ALJ

    Starbucks did not violate federal labor law at a Michigan store by firing a union backer who cursed at his boss in front of customers, but crossed the line by canning another worker who used more measured language, a National Labor Relations Board judge said Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • Extra NLRB Risks To Consider From Joint Employer Rule Edit

    Author Photo

    The National Labor Relations Board’s return to a broad definition of “joint employer” will expose companies — even those with only theoretical control of their outside consultants, contractors or franchise workers — to increased labor obligations and risks, further escalating their already expanding National Labor Relations Act liabilities, says William Kishman at Squire Patton.

  • AI At Work: Safety And NLRA Best Practices For Employers

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    There are many possible legal ramifications associated with integrating artificial intelligence tools and solutions into workplaces, including unionized workplaces' employer obligations under the National Labor Relations Act, and health and safety issues concerning robots and AI, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • How Employers Can Navigate NLRB's Pro-Employee Shift

    Author Photo

    The National Labor Relations Board's recent decisions and general counsel memos mark the strong beginning of a trend toward greater pro-employee protections, so employers should proactively engage in risk management by revisiting their handbook policies accordingly, say attorneys at Foley & Lardner.

  • Justices' Coming Fisheries Ruling May Foster NLRA Certainty

    Author Photo

    If the U.S. Supreme Court’s forthcoming decision in the Loper Bright v. Raimondi commercial fisheries' case overrules judicial deference to federal agencies' legal interpretations, it could carry over to the National Labor Relations Board's vacillating interpretations of the National Labor Relations Act, bringing a measure of predictability to the board’s administration of the law, says Corey Franklin at FordHarrison.

  • Aviation Watch: When Are Pilots Too Old To Fly?

    Author Photo

    A recent move by the U.S. House of Representatives to raise the mandatory retirement age for airline pilots from 65 to 67 has reignited a decades-long debate — but this issue is best addressed through collective bargaining between carriers and pilots, rather than through legislation, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • 2 NLRB Rulings On Unilateral Changes Are Bad News For Cos.

    Author Photo

    The National Labor Relations Board's recent rulings in Wendt and Tecnocap on unilateral changes to employment terms shift bargaining leverage away from companies, but certain considerations can help employers navigate a contractual hiatus and negotiations for a first union contract, says Henry Morris Jr. at ArentFox Schiff.

  • NY Co-Ops Must Avoid Pitfalls When Navigating Insurance

    Author Photo

    In light of skyrocketing premiums, tricky exclusions and dwindling options, New York cooperative corporations must carefully review potential contractors' insurance policies in order to secure full protection, as even seemingly minor contractor jobs can carry significant risk due to New York labor laws, says Eliot Zuckerman at Smith Gambrell.

  • What Employers Face As NLRB Protects More Solo Protests

    Author Photo

    Given the National Labor Relations Board’s recent decision in Miller Plastics to implement a broader standard for when it will protect individual protests, employers must be careful to not open themselves to unfair labor practice claims when disciplining employees with personal gripes, says Mohamed Barry at Fisher Phillips.

  • USW Ruling Highlights Successor Liability In Bankruptcy Sale

    Author Photo

    A Delaware federal court's recent decision in United Steelworkers v. Braeburn is important for potential asset purchasers in Section 363 bankruptcy sales as it found the purchaser was subject to obligations under the National Labor Relations Act notwithstanding language in the sale approval order transferring the debtor's assets free and clear of successor liability, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Starbucks 'Memphis 7' Ruling Shows Retaliation Is A Bad Idea

    Author Photo

    Starbucks’ unsuccessful attempts to quash unionization by retaliating against organizing employees — illustrated by the Sixth Circuit's recent backing of an order that forced the company to rehire seven pro-union workers in Memphis, Tennessee — demonstrates why employers should eschew hard-line tactics and instead foster genuine dialogue with their workforce, says Janette Levey at Levey Law.

  • 3 Employer Considerations In Light Of DOL Proposed OT Rule

    Author Photo

    A recently unveiled rule from the U.S. Department of Labor would increase the salary threshold for Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemptions, and while the planned changes are not the law just yet, employers should start thinking about the best ways to position their organizations for compliance in the future, say Brodie Erwin and Sarah Spangenburg at Kilpatrick.

  • Employers, Buckle Up For Fast-Track NLRB Election Rules

    Author Photo

    Under the National Labor Relations Board's recent changes to its secret ballot election rules, employers will face short timelines and deferral of many legal issues — so they would be well advised to develop robust plans to address these developments now, say attorneys at Baker Donelson.

  • Key Strike Considerations For Automotive Industry Suppliers

    Author Photo

    As the UAW's labor contracts with Detroit's Big Three automakers expire, and the possibility of a strike looms, automotive industry suppliers face a number of possible legal and operational issues — and should have strategic action plans in place to deal with contracts, liquidity, the post-strike environment and more, say experts at Alvarez & Marsal.

Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Employment Authority Labor archive.