Labor

  • May 20, 2024

    Justices Turn Away Hospital Construction Feud

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday rejected a case that centers on a $180 million project to expand a Mississippi children's hospital, once again declining to resolve whether parties that agree to certain arbitral rules have also agreed to delegate jurisdictional questions to the arbitrator.

  • May 20, 2024

    Alibaba Resists Class Cert. Over Failed Ant Group IPO

    Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba has again urged a New York federal judge not to certify a class of investors who claim they weren't warned about regulatory risks Alibaba faced in the lead-up to a $34 billion initial public offering of its fintech affiliate, saying the suit's challenged misstatements did not affect Alibaba's stock price.

  • May 20, 2024

    Texas Judge Rescinds Denial Of SpaceX's Rethink Bid

    A Texas federal judge on Monday walked back his decision last week not to reconsider an order transferring SpaceX's National Labor Relations Board constitutionality dispute to a California court, saying he is "awaiting input from the Fifth Circuit."

  • May 20, 2024

    NLRB Resets Bad Faith Line In Bargaining Redo

    A recent National Labor Relations Board ruling that George Washington University Hospital sabotaged union negotiations by demanding unreasonable concessions reinforces that the content of a party's proposals may render them illegal, departing from the Trump-era board's approach in the same case.

  • May 20, 2024

    NLRB Attys Say Mich. Starbucks Injunction Row Must Proceed

    The U.S. Supreme Court's pending decision over a National Labor Relations Board injunction standard shouldn't pause a Michigan federal court case against Starbucks seeking reinstatement of fired employees, the board argued Monday, saying a stay would be detrimental to the workers' interests.

  • May 20, 2024

    NLRB Judge Says Amazon Has 'Proclivity' For Violating NLRA

    Amazon's "proclivity to violate" federal labor law justifies broad remedies including a notice reading at a facility on Staten Island, New York, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding the e-commerce giant illegally barred a pro-union banner in the break room and threatened workers.

  • May 20, 2024

    UPS Unit's Firing Of Organizer Flouted Law, NLRB Judge Says

    A UPS unit violated federal labor law by firing an employee who led a union drive at a company warehouse in Tracy, California, a National Labor Relations Board judge has ruled.

  • May 20, 2024

    6th Circ. Orders Sanctioned Prison Co. To Pay NLRB Atty Fees

    The Sixth Circuit said a Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor has to pay the U.S. National Labor Relations Board's attorney fees from arguing the contractor should be held in contempt in a dispute over two fired union supporters, with one judge dissenting in part over 0.4 billable hour.

  • May 17, 2024

    UC Says Union Trying To Illegally Strike Amid Campus Protest

    The University of California system is accusing the union that represents its graduate student workers of calling for an illegal strike over the university system's pushback to pro-Palestine campus protests, filing an unfair labor practice charge Friday.

  • May 17, 2024

    Teamsters Unit Says Steel Co. Didn't Follow Rehire Order

    A Teamsters local accused a steel manufacturer of not abiding by an arbitration award that required the reinstatement of a fired employee, urging a Michigan federal judge to make the company cough up back pay and attorney fees.

  • May 17, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Say Ohio Workers' Bribery Suit Untimely

    The United Auto Workers and Fiat Chrysler told an Ohio federal judge Friday that a recent Sixth Circuit decision nullifies a racketeering lawsuit from plant workers trying to tie their claims of lost wages and benefits to an illicit bribery scheme involving former union and company officials.

  • May 17, 2024

    NLRB Orders Spa To Rehire Worker Fired Over Wage Talk

    The National Labor Relations Board ordered a Hawaii spa to rehire a worker after the company failed to contest a claim that it fired her for talking to co-workers about their pay.

  • May 17, 2024

    NLRB Restores Union Election Loss, Says Toss Was Improper

    The National Labor Relations Board restored a loss for an International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers local in a representation election at a company in Washington state, saying an NLRB official's decision to erase the loss after finding merit to unfair labor practice allegations doesn't comply with board procedure.

  • May 17, 2024

    Industry Emboldened After Justices Galvanize Agency Attacks

    In the year since the U.S. Supreme Court said "extraordinary" and "far-reaching" attacks on administrative enforcers can skip agency tribunals and go straight to federal district court, ambitious challenges to regulatory powers are rapidly gaining traction, and the high court is poised to put them on an even firmer footing.

  • May 17, 2024

    Mercedes Workers Reject UAW In Blow To Organizing Drive

    Workers at Mercedes-Benz manufacturing facilities outside Tuscaloosa, Alabama, have voted against representation by the United Auto Workers, an early setback for the union as it seeks to organize nonunion automakers in the United States.

  • May 17, 2024

    Texas Judge Denies SpaceX's Rethink Bid In Transfer Spat

    A Texas federal judge won't reconsider his decision to transfer SpaceX's constitutional challenge to the National Labor Relations Board's structure to a California court, saying on Friday that the rocket company didn't give a "compelling reason" to rethink the ruling.

  • May 17, 2024

    NY Forecast: Doctor's Disability Bias Case Goes To 2nd Circ.

    In the coming week, the Second Circuit will hear a former New York University hospital doctor's bid to revive his suit claiming the hospital discriminated against him on the basis of his disability by denying him work accommodations before firing him. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 17, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Justices To Hear If Prop 22 Constitutional

    In the coming week, attorneys should watch for California Supreme Court oral arguments regarding the validity of the Proposition 22 ballot measure from 2020. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters coming up in California.

  • May 16, 2024

    Bad Bunny's Sports Firm Says MLBPA Gave It 'Death Penalty'

    Rimas Sports, the sports agency of mega music superstar Bad Bunny, is suing the Major League Baseball Players Association in Puerto Rico federal court, saying the union effectively killed its business with unreasonable sanctions in order to protect its "good ole boy" club of established agencies.

  • May 16, 2024

    5 Ripe Issues For The Biden NLRB To Decide

    The National Labor Relations Board has more than two dozen ripe issues on its docket, including the legality of so-called captive audience meetings, workers’ rights to use company email and chat systems, and compensation for workers whose bosses delay union negotiations. Here, Law360 looks at these and other issues the board could soon decide.

  • May 16, 2024

    JB Hunt Is Not Joint Employer Of Drivers, NLRB Official Says

    United Natural Foods Inc. delivery drivers in Pennsylvania may vote on whether they want a Teamsters local to represent them, a National Labor Relations Board regional director determined Thursday, while finding that J.B. Hunt is not a joint employer of these workers.

  • May 16, 2024

    Nonprofit Lawfully Withdrew Recognition, NLRB Judge Says

    A nonprofit food service company near Albany, New York, lawfully withdrew recognition from a Service Employee International Union local, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding the agency prosecutors hadn't shown that unfair labor practices and a decertification petition were linked.

  • May 16, 2024

    NLRB Tells DC Circ. Not To Rehear Stalled Bargaining Case

    The National Labor Relations Board urged the full D.C. Circuit to reject an auto parts manufacturer's request to reconsider a March decision upholding the board's ruling that the company unlawfully withdrew recognition from a United Auto Workers local, saying the company is mistaken that the board's ruling altered precedent.

  • May 16, 2024

    NLRB Remands Chicken Co.'s Election Objection For Hearing

    A split National Labor Relations Board panel remanded a chicken processor's challenge of a representation election based on the claim that a union offered to waive initiation fees, with a dissenting board member finding a lack of evidence to support a hearing.

  • May 15, 2024

    Mass. Judge Takes First Pass At NLRB's Cemex Test

    A Massachusetts federal judge has ordered a cannabis company to bargain with the United Food and Commercial Workers in the first application of the National Labor Relations Board’s Cemex standard to an injunction case. Here, Law360 explores takeaways from the novel decision.

Expert Analysis

  • Why Minor League Labor Negotiations Will Be Complicated

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    Despite the Major League Baseball voluntarily recognizing the recently announced Minor League Baseball union and avoiding a potentially contentious process, the forthcoming labor negotiations will be complex for multiple reasons — from minor leaguer demographics to the specter of antitrust scrutiny, says Christopher Deubert at Constangy Brooks.

  • Alternatives For Employers Considering Workforce Reduction

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Employers' reduction in force decisions can be costly, increase exposure to employment lawsuits and lower morale of remaining employees, but certain other approaches can help reduce labor costs while minimizing the usual consequences, say Andrew Sommer and Megan Shaked at Conn Maciel.

  • How Weingarten Rights May Operate In A Nonunion Workplace

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    A recent National Labor Relations Board memo signals an interest in giving nonunion employees a right to have a coworker representative present in disciplinary hearings, but concerned employers may find solace in limits the agency has placed on union employees' Weingarten rights over the years, say David Pryzbylski and Thomas Payne at Barnes & Thornburg.

  • Employer Discipline Lessons In DC Circ. Vulgar Protest Ruling

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent ruling in Constellium Rolled Products v. NLRB — that a worker was improperly fired for using profanity while protesting company policy — highlights confusion surrounding worker protections for concerted activity and the high bar for employers to prove discipline is unrelated to such activity, say John Hargrove and Anne Yuengert at Bradley Arant.

  • NLRB Reversal On Union Apparel Is A Warning For Employers

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent reversal of Trump-era case law in its Tesla ruling significantly limits when employers may restrict union insignia on clothing in the workplace and provides multiple cautionary takeaways for employers, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • Proposed NLRB Rule Would Vastly Expand Joint Employment

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    The National Labor Relations Board’s recently proposed rule for determining when joint employment exists would replace a 2020 standard with expansive new definitions, including the problematic addition of workplace health and safety as an essential term and condition, says Todd Lebowitz at BakerHostetler.

  • Key Takeaways From Calif.'s Sweeping Fast-Food Wage Law

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    California Gov. Gavin Newsom recently signed a controversial wage bill that will have a major impact on fast-food employers and employees, will likely shape how the state regulates other industries in the future, and represents a radical step toward sectoral bargaining, says Pooja Nair at Ervin Cohen.

  • Prepare For NLRB Collaboration With Antitrust Agencies

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    The National Labor Relations Board's recent agreements with the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice may herald increased interagency engagement on noncompete and no-poach issues, so companies that face scrutiny from one agency may well quickly be in the crosshairs of another, say attorneys at BakerHostetler.

  • Watson Discipline Case Shows NFL's Power In Labor Disputes

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    While the six-game suspension a disciplinary officer recently ordered against Cleveland Browns quarterback Deshaun Watson aligns with labor law standards, the NFL has authority to increase the punishment with little to no recourse for Watson or the NFL Players Association — thanks to the 2016 “Deflategate” case, says Michael Elkins at MLE Law.

  • Why Gig Platforms Should Be On Alert

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    The Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general have set their sights on the gig economy and practices they view as deceptive and unfair, which will open gig platforms to more scrutiny — and past cases against gig-economy giants including Uber and Instacart are cautionary tales to keep in mind, say attorneys at Venable.

  • What New Captive Audience Law Means For Conn. Employers

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    Given a new Connecticut law that allows employees to opt out of captive audience meetings where employers share religious or political opinions, companies will need to address the liability risks posed by this substantial expansion of employee free speech rights, say attorneys at Shipman & Goodwin.

  • More Employment Regs May See 'Major Questions' Challenges

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent use of the major questions doctrine to strike down regulation has already been cited in lower court cases challenging U.S. Department of Labor authority to implement wage and hour changes, and could provide a potent tool to litigants seeking to restrain federal workplace and labor regulations, say Jeffrey Brecher and Courtney Malveaux at Jackson Lewis.

  • Wage Theft Bill Would Increase Risk, Severity Of FLSA Claims

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    A recently introduced bill would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act in extreme ways that go well beyond the commonsense idea that people should be paid the wages they have earned, thereby sharply increasing the threat of claims against employers, with implications for arbitration, collective bargaining and more, say Christopher Pardo and Beth Sherwood at Hunton.

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